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Homelessness Is Not a Costume

 

 

Halloween is an exciting time of year for those who celebrate it, but it’s important to keep in mind what message you’re sending with your costume.

In recent years, many marginalized groups have pushed back against people who dress up as their culture for the holiday. A group of Ohio University students created a poster campaign titled We’re a Culture, Not a Costumewhich displayed students of color presenting images of people using their race or culture as a costume. This impactful series went viral online and continues to be shared every October.

Dressing up as any marginalized group is harmful, and one costume seems to be a perennial last-minute favorite – the homeless hobo.

You probably can imagine the hobo caricature with ragged clothes and all his belongings tied up in a handkerchief on the top of a stick he slings over his shoulder while he thumbs for a ride. Sound familiar? Historically, hobos were men without homes who would ride trains from city to city looking for work. Once the railroad industry was overshadowed by automobiles, the hobo caricature faded into history, but homelessness didn’t end there.

Consider those who are still experiencing homelessness. They might have the same descriptors: a person wearing old clothes, belongings stuffed in a trash bag, standing at an intersection with a sign asking for help. Although the imagery has changed, the need to preserve the dignity of our vulnerable neighbors remains the same.

This Halloween, please don’t dress up like a person experiencing homelessness. It’s unthinkable that anyone would dress up as someone experiencing domestic violence or as a child in extreme poverty. So please respect our clients’ humanity as you plan your Halloween costume this year.

 

Montgomery County Coalition for the Homeless (MCCH) is a non-profit with the mission to provide solutions in Montgomery County to ensure that homelessness is rare, brief, and nonrecurring. Learn more about MCCH.

3 Responses

  1. Vibrators
    | Reply

    Homeless people in rural areas are more likely to be white, female, married, currently working, homeless for the first time, and homeless for a shorter period of time

  2. Eden Fantasys
    | Reply

    MCCH is a great non-profit. They are really solving homelessness in Montgomery County. This is a place where your voice will be heard and it is small enough that the leadership really take the opportunity to get to know everyone. This agency cares deeply about the clients served and the employees are some of the best I have worked with!

    • Maggie McGill
      | Reply

      Thanks for your kind words, Eden!

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